Electric heat options

Water Heaters, Furnaces, Air Conditioners, Refrigerators, Ranges
KYAvion
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Re: Electric heat options

Post by KYAvion » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:50 pm

Love it. The way it circulates air is incredible.
KYAvion
1984 Avion 30R

nralifer
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Re: Electric heat options

Post by nralifer » Sat Oct 21, 2017 11:55 am

If anyone is interested, Vornado has a sale ($79) and free shipping on the heater/fan like we have. Ours is black, but the site doesn't list a black one, but they do list a couple of different white colors. (Saw the sale when I was checking for another RV'ing friend.)

https://www.vornado.com/shop/heaters/vh ... oom-heater
nra1ifer
1987 Avion 34W
Every day is a good day..... some are just better than others!

Rostam
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2016 9:54 pm

Re: Electric heat options

Post by Rostam » Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:33 am

I bought this heater from Amazon for around $50:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B1 ... UTF8&psc=1

The Long Long Honeymoon folks had recommended it. Have not used it yet. May get to use it this week. If so will report back.
1978 Avion 26-H (Rear twin beds, center bath, front dinette)
2012 Mercedes Benz GL 350 Bluetec, 3.0L V6 Turbo Diesel, 3.45 Axle Ratio

silverloaf
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:01 pm

Re: Electric heat options

Post by silverloaf » Sun Oct 22, 2017 8:38 pm

nralifer wrote:If anyone is interested, Vornado has a sale ($79) and free shipping on the heater/fan like we have. Ours is black, but the site doesn't list a black one, but they do list a couple of different white colors. (Saw the sale when I was checking for another RV'ing friend.)

https://www.vornado.com/shop/heaters/vh ... oom-heater
The fan options described in this thread are intriguing. But little has been mentioned about the integrity of their trailer's wiring and plugs to handle a 1500 watt load.

We have at least one 20 amp wall plug on our 1988 30P that has been seared from excessive load by a prior owner. I have been systematically taking apart all 12v and 110v electrical connections. I have found some degree of oxidation on every one.

This corrosion can amplify the current draw of any plug-in appliance beyond its limits. I have read reviews of space heaters where owners complained of having the heater's plug getting hot or melting.

My interest here is the health and safety of all Avion owners. I may well purchase a space heater some day. I need to be prudent upon the conditions under which it operates.
Bob

KYAvion
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Re: Electric heat options

Post by KYAvion » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:42 pm

A 1500 watt heater at its max setting draws around 12.5 amps. A 20 amp breaker with 12 gauge wire at 80% would be 16 amps, so unless other appliances are running and drawing a lot of juice the wiring should be OK. Most of the receptacles are on a single 20 amp breaker though, so a dedicated circuit for a space heater wouldn't be a bad idea to avoid overloading.
KYAvion
1984 Avion 30R

nralifer
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Re: Electric heat options

Post by nralifer » Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:57 pm

I am probably a little over-protective, but when we have the Vornado turned on (usually on 1500W setting), I rarely run anything else that draws a lot of current, and I definitely don't plug other heavy loads into outlets on the same side of the trailer.
nra1ifer
1987 Avion 34W
Every day is a good day..... some are just better than others!

silverloaf
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:01 pm

Re: Electric heat options

Post by silverloaf » Mon Oct 23, 2017 9:17 am

nralifer wrote:I am probably a little over-protective, but when we have the Vornado turned on (usually on 1500W setting), I rarely run anything else that draws a lot of current, and I definitely don't plug other heavy loads into outlets on the same side of the trailer.
My comments were not directed at you to insult your intelligence or the fan you have chosen. I meant them to be general in nature. I apologize if they appeared otherwise.

A 20 amp circuit is more than capable of safely handling up to 16 amp current draw. The concern has to do with the wall outlets themselves.

Outlets that have seen years of heavy use and load (toasters, hair dryers, heaters, etc.) develop gaps and oxidation between the contact points. Trailers in cold climate areas (like ours) are also exposed to swings in temperature and humidity which can marginalize points of conductivity. These conditions can increase the current draw beyond the 16 amp safe-zone.

I have at least 2 outlets in the kitchen area of our 29-year-old trailer that are scorched; one is clearly visible and one is not. I shouldn't be surprised since our trailer has seen multiple owners over the years. Since I have no history on the outlets in our trailer, I'm going to change them all.

I commend you (and others) for establishing limits and criteria on how, when and where your heater will be used. Others may not be so prudent and diligent; hence my comments.

Years of experience have taught me to treat age-related electrical systems with a very healthy respect. That's all I'm trying to convey.

Bob

nralifer
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Re: Electric heat options

Post by nralifer » Mon Oct 23, 2017 5:31 pm

Hey, Bob. No offense taken whatsoever..... and your comments make me want to inspect the outlets in our Avion!
nra1ifer
1987 Avion 34W
Every day is a good day..... some are just better than others!

silverloaf
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:01 pm

Re: Electric heat options

Post by silverloaf » Tue Oct 24, 2017 8:39 am

nralifer wrote:Hey, Bob. No offense taken whatsoever..... and your comments make me want to inspect the outlets in our Avion!
I suppose I read more into your comments than you were trying to convey. Thank you for clarifying.

Permit me to continue my comments primarily for the wide body of Avion and other vintage trailer owners:

Due to high current draw,12 volt connections in particular are vulnerable to oxidation and corrosion (think car battery). With so many incandescent lights and appliances in an Avion trailer, there will likely be corrosion "tells" at every juncture. Most wiring is stranded which allows a greater concentration of corrosion between the strands.

Trailer-specific batteries have to fight against corrosion to deliver power. Battery life is precious to boon-dockers; wire and socket corrosion can become their battery's worst nemesis.

The advent of LED lighting offers huge reduction in power consumption. But maximizing this reduction is only as good as the socket or fixture (if replacing it). For example, circuit wiring between fixtures is typically twisted together with the fixture's wire. If the twisted and stranded circuit connection is not clean, each fixture suffers from the "sins" of each other.

This is why I am dismantling, inspecting, cleaning and sealing each wiring connection throughout our trailer. Below are several websites with a process and typical product that I have found.

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to- ... n-minutes/

https://www.permatex.com/products/adhes ... ical-tape/

Bob

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